est.
1982

bio

wesley dean carr

Wesley Dean didn’t need to leave Australia. For more than a dozen years, he’d been one of the continent’s best-known artists, armed with a larger-than-life voice that catapulted songs like “You” to the top of the Australian charts. Even so, the Adelaide native found himself boarding an American-bound plane in early 2021, his wife and two sons at his side, the entire family heading toward their new home in Nashville.

the journey begins...

Dean had visited Nashville a decade earlier, not long after winning the sixth season of Australian Idol. The show had launched him to stardom, but it was the time he'd already spent honing his craft — the Motown songs he sang during childhood; the three-hour shows he played in Sydney pubs as a teenager; the critically-acclaimed band, Tambalane, he formed with Silverchair's Ben Gillies at 21 years old — that readied him for the spotlight. Inspired to blur the lines between roots-rock, soul, and folk with his solo career, he made that initial trip to Nashville in search of likeminded collaborators. Years later, he returned to Nashville looking for something else: a new beginning.

"I was chasing down a life-long dream," Dean says, who'd spent the immediate years before his American migration living in a sea shanty town on the Sunshine Coast, quietly reevaluating his priorities. The Sunshine Coast's leisurely pace had been a godsend, allowing Dean a break from the career he'd been relentlessly pursuing since boyhood. He briefly stepped away from music during that time… and when he returned to it, he did so on his own terms, writing songs that mixed heartland hooks with heart-baring honesty. Starting with "Never Goin' Back to the Darkside" and "Where Only You and I Remain," a new album began taking shape, one whose creation would soon take Dean halfway across the world.

With its mix of authentic Americana and modern-day roots music, unknown is an album about departures and arrivals. These 14 songs tell the autobiographical story of Dean's life-changing relocation, bookended by the cathartic "Leave Adelaide Alone" — which opens the record with ringing electric guitars, accordion, and a meteoric chorus — and the album-closing title track, a soulful piano ballad that unfolds like a conversation between Dean and the loved ones he's left behind. Recorded in his newly-adopted hometown of Nashville and written on both sides of his transpacific flight, unknown marks the rebirth of an artist who's scaled the long ladder of success, enjoyed the view from the top, and taken a much-needed breather… only to rededicate himself to the climb all over again.

For Wesley Dean, the journey began when he was 8 years old. A gifted vocalist, he honed his chops by singing along to Jackson 5 classics like "I'll Be There" and "Mama's Pearl" at a young age, then became a fixture on Sydney's barroom stages as, Wes Carr, before he could legally drink. Appearing on Australian Idol made Carr a household name across the continent, and he released two gold-certified singles in the wake of his first-place finish, along with a studio album that peaked at Number 2 in his homeland. He later reclaimed his independence after spending multiple years on a major label's roster, continuing to play some of Australia's biggest stages — from Sydney Opera House to Melbourne's Palais Theatre — along the way.

After a decade, the rigors of the road grew wearisome for the songwriter, who'd become a family man since his full-length debut blazed its path up the charts. It was time for a change of scenery. "We moved to the Sunshine Coast in pursuit of a quieter, simpler life," he says. "We had no plan and not a lot of money, but those five years turned out to be the greatest times of our lives. There were new friends and palm trees and barbecues every Saturday. The wine was flowing. It was like semi-retirement, in a way."

Dean began spending less time on tour and more time with his family. He stopped writing as often. Music was once his north star, but now it was something distant, its light waning by the day. Yet even as he questioned his career path, he found himself unable to shake the feeling that there was more work to be done. Staying behind while his wife and children left town for a 10-day vacation, Dean found himself alone in the family's beach house, acoustic guitar in hand, ready to see if the muse would still answer when he knocked. It did. What followed was the most fruitful songwriting period of his career. For 10 days, Dean threw himself into the creative process, finishing 20 songs before his family returned. The experience helped restore his creative drive and open his musical floodgates once again, and when the time came for another change of scenery, Dean steered the family toward Nashville.

unknown nods to that personal history, but this is an album about the present, not the past. Not long after landing in Tennessee, Dean got back to work, writing more songs about regrets, big risks, and fresh starts. He also reconnected with some of the collaborators he'd met during his first trip to Tennessee, including engineer Justin Cortelyou, and forged partnerships with new friends like co-writer Fred Wilhelm. They worked fast, capturing every spark of inspiration and fanning the flames into something big and bright. Together, the musicians layered piano-driven tracks like "That's Why I'm Here" with organ and light percussion, added swirls of atmospheric guitar to "Never Thought Of You," and channeled heartland heroes like Tom Petty on the driving, determined "Hello, I Love You, Goodbye."

"I'd write a song and immediately record it," Dean remembers of those inspired months, which mirrored the creative growth spurt he'd experienced on the Sunshine Coast. "We encapsulated this big feeling of traveling overseas from Australia to America, arriving in our new home, and finding our way forward."

There were still obstacles to overcome. When a business relationship went south, Dean found himself without the American support system he'd originally been promised. Meanwhile, the Australian borders remained closed, meaning he couldn't return home even if he'd wanted to. Choosing purpose over panic, he redoubled his commitment to Nashville and wrote "Gaslighter," an empowered track that's more anthemic than angry. "It was like someone was putting me through a test, just to make sure I was really serious about doing this," he says. "Out of all these negatives came some amazing blessings. Life is made up of those blessings. The beauty is, they reveal themselves in every way as we step further into the unknown."

the journey begins...

Dean had visited Nashville a decade earlier, not long after winning the sixth season of Australian Idol. The show had launched him to stardom, but it was the time he’d already spent honing his craft — the Motown songs he sang during childhood; the three-hour shows he played in Sydney pubs as a teenager; the critically-acclaimed band, Tambalane, he formed with Silverchair’s Ben Gillies at 21 years old — that readied him for the spotlight. Inspired to blur the lines between roots-rock, soul, and folk with his solo career, he made that initial trip to Nashville in search of likeminded collaborators. Years later, he returned to Nashville looking for something else: a new beginning.

“I was chasing down a life-long dream,” Dean says, who’d spent the immediate years before his American migration living in a sea shanty town on the Sunshine Coast, quietly reevaluating his priorities. The Sunshine Coast’s leisurely pace had been a godsend, allowing Dean a break from the career he’d been relentlessly pursuing since boyhood. He briefly stepped away from music during that time… and when he returned to it, he did so on his own terms, writing songs that mixed heartland hooks with heart-baring honesty. Starting with “Never Goin’ Back to the Darkside” and “Where Only You and I Remain,” a new album began taking shape, one whose creation would soon take Dean halfway across the world.

With its mix of authentic Americana and modern-day roots music, unknown is an album about departures and arrivals. These 14 songs tell the autobiographical story of Dean’s life-changing relocation, bookended by the cathartic “Leave Adelaide Alone” — which opens the record with ringing electric guitars, accordion, and a meteoric chorus — and the album-closing title track, a soulful piano ballad that unfolds like a conversation between Dean and the loved ones he’s left behind. Recorded in his newly-adopted hometown of Nashville and written on both sides of his transpacific flight, unknown marks the rebirth of an artist who’s scaled the long ladder of success, enjoyed the view from the top, and taken a much-needed breather… only to rededicate himself to the climb all over again.

For Wesley Dean, the journey began when he was 8 years old. A gifted vocalist, he honed his chops by singing along to Jackson 5 classics like “I’ll Be There” and “Mama’s Pearl” at a young age, then became a fixture on Sydney’s barroom stages as, Wes Carr, before he could legally drink. Appearing on Australian Idol made Carr a household name across the continent, and he released two gold-certified singles in the wake of his first-place finish, along with a studio album that peaked at Number 2 in his homeland. He later reclaimed his independence after spending multiple years on a major label’s roster, continuing to play some of Australia’s biggest stages — from Sydney Opera House to Melbourne’s Palais Theatre — along the way.

After a decade, the rigors of the road grew wearisome for the songwriter, who’d become a family man since his full-length debut blazed its path up the charts. It was time for a change of scenery. “We moved to the Sunshine Coast in pursuit of a quieter, simpler life,” he says. “We had no plan and not a lot of money, but those five years turned out to be the greatest times of our lives. There were new friends and palm trees and barbecues every Saturday. The wine was flowing. It was like semi-retirement, in a way.”

Dean began spending less time on tour and more time with his family. He stopped writing as often. Music was once his north star, but now it was something distant, its light waning by the day. Yet even as he questioned his career path, he found himself unable to shake the feeling that there was more work to be done. Staying behind while his wife and children left town for a 10-day vacation, Dean found himself alone in the family’s beach house, acoustic guitar in hand, ready to see if the muse would still answer when he knocked. It did. What followed was the most fruitful songwriting period of his career. For 10 days, Dean threw himself into the creative process, finishing 20 songs before his family returned. The experience helped restore his creative drive and open his musical floodgates once again, and when the time came for another change of scenery, Dean steered the family toward Nashville.

unknown nods to that personal history, but this is an album about the present, not the past. Not long after landing in Tennessee, Dean got back to work, writing more songs about regrets, big risks, and fresh starts. He also reconnected with some of the collaborators he’d met during his first trip to Tennessee, including engineer Justin Cortelyou, and forged partnerships with new friends like co-writer Fred Wilhelm. They worked fast, capturing every spark of inspiration and fanning the flames into something big and bright. Together, the musicians layered piano-driven tracks like “That’s Why I’m Here” with organ and light percussion, added swirls of atmospheric guitar to “Never Thought Of You,” and channeled heartland heroes like Tom Petty on the driving, determined “Hello, I Love You, Goodbye.”

“I’d write a song and immediately record it,” Dean remembers of those inspired months, which mirrored the creative growth spurt he’d experienced on the Sunshine Coast. “We encapsulated this big feeling of traveling overseas from Australia to America, arriving in our new home, and finding our way forward.”

There were still obstacles to overcome. When a business relationship went south, Dean found himself without the American support system he’d originally been promised. Meanwhile, the Australian borders remained closed, meaning he couldn’t return home even if he’d wanted to. Choosing purpose over panic, he redoubled his commitment to Nashville and wrote “Gaslighter,” an empowered track that’s more anthemic than angry. “It was like someone was putting me through a test, just to make sure I was really serious about doing this,” he says. “Out of all these negatives came some amazing blessings. Life is made up of those blessings. The beauty is, they reveal themselves in every way as we step further into the unknown.”

what people are saying about wesley dean...

His quiet, knowing way of disarming and describing life’s more showboating emotions has been compared to that of Chris Stapleton, but the truer and much more apt analogy is Kris Kristofferson

QRO Mag

Regardless, contrary to its title, Unknown is a bold effort and one that ought to find him making  an emphatic imprint in his new environs. With any luck at all, Unknown will gain all the attention it deserves.

Rock n Roll Globe

The biggest thing I took away from unknown was just how fantastic it was from a full album perspective. As a lover of records from the 60s and 70s—the kind you could drop a needle on and just let spin.

Americana Highways

His vocal talents are unquestionable. His songs are sincere. He still has big choices ahead because his knack for radio-friendly songs could easily make him a major star again or he could settle into less glamorous singer-songwriter mode. He bears watching.

Glide Magazine

In today’s uncertain world, the unknown can be a difficult thing to embrace. Wesley Dean pushes past those challenges with unknown, turning his own leap of faith into art. This is his musical reawakening — a battlecry from a longtime road warrior who’s nowhere near done. Vocally Dean has never sounded better.

Entertainment Focus

There is one moment on the record that trumps all others though and that’s the incredible ‘Pages’. At three minutes and one second, it’s the shortest song on the record but good God is it absolute perfection. Sparse piano backs Dean’s quavering voice before it opens up into a melody-filled emotional song that genuinely brought tears to me eyes. Dean’s vocal is jaw-dropping on the track as he sings about forgiveness and pushing forward in life.

If you’re a fan of the likes of Kip Moore and Chris Stapleton, then you really should check out Wesley Dean. ‘Unknown’ is an album that comes from the heart and it’s a statement from an artist that knows who he is and where he’s heading.

Entertainment Focus 

If anyone deserves a breakout year in 2022, it’s Wesley Dean.

Entertainment Focus 

A radio-friendly slice of Country rock that starts the record on a high and allows Dean to wow you with his soaring voice.

Entertainment Focus

Produced and mixed by Justin Cortelyou, it is a record alive with the burning lakes and sheathed swords of a shoeless hero who sought to learn all there was to know about this ravening monster known as mankind. Unknown is an Excalibur tale, told from the standpoint of the Stone. Road fables this autobiographical can only be properly read aloud by a voice with some traffic in it, and Wesley Dean’s voice is vintage corduroy in a marmalade shade, full of tomahawk tones that either turn like a coiled serpent in his palm or ring out like a mIdnight mass held in the bright sacrament of high noon.

QRO Mag 

wesleydean

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NEW YORK! Can’t wait to play solo acoustic for you at the legendary @rockwoodmusichall see you there my friends! 🤘please tag your mates New York! 🔥stage 3 at 8:30pm #newyork #rockwoodmusichall #wesleydean
Where are my people of NYC! ♥️🖤 can’t wait to play @rockwoodmusichall on the 11th of March on stage at 8:30. Come down & let’s hang! #nyc  #nycmusic #music #live #acoustic #wesleydean
Half of a new tune - Just a series of observations in a song.. if the future of songwriting is AI generated algorithms well I’m gonna be out of rhythm  and write for us humans... what do you think? 🔥BURN THIS HOUSE 🔥

This one goes out to the clinically insane
 to the dreamers and lovers that are runnin from pain 
 the deniers and survivors and the
the hero’s without  capes 
To a whole generation screaming for change 

for the believers do gooders and the not so holy 
for the brave that speak out against the majority 
 for the women and men who are sent to war 
for the ones who die alone and never get born 

change is gonna come 
They’ll be flames on everyone 
and you’re  gonna get your turn 
to stand in line and watch it all burn 
only god can save us now
So let’s burn this house down

And to the ones who  stayed awake And ended up woke 
To all good intention lost in mirrors and smoke 
to the ones you got the honest job and are paving the way 
for a billionaires future where your children are the slaves
I grew up fantasising about jamming in an American garage .. first rehearsal of 2023! Playing @electricjane in Feb - Can’t wait!
Flowers by @mileycyrus great tune! Love it 🙏🤘🔥 #flowersbymiley would be a dream to tour with someone like Miley, she’s the real deal, true artistry at its finest! 🖤
First verse and chorus of a New song ‘LETS RUN’ or ‘Charlie get the gun’ what do you think I should call this one?  Still working on it - Wrote this one after feeling isolated in the haunted house we lived in for almost 2 years since being in Nashville. So glad we’re out of there. But grateful for the experience too .. 😬 There’s been so many great times since arriving in Nashville and amazing people we have met and connected with and so many very uncertain and anxious times = balance I guess 🫠 the good always outweighs the bad - I think moving countries in the middle of a pandemic with a young family added to some of the pressure but also not finding our place, it took a minute to settle in plus I was represented by the wrong people and it was the first ever time in my life that I doubted myself and my music but I realised it was the toxic situation I had found myself in and that I needed to start listening to myself again which had been lost cause I convinced myself that everyone else knew best, never again I promise.. I write my music for the people of my age and anyone who resonates with it plus I write for me I don’t pretend to be anything else.. 
i play a 12 string for this tune, it’s my first 12 string song & I wrote it on our good friends @maryscottthorne Dad’s 12 string they let me borrow it.. thanks guys 🙏. i shared a bit of the band version a few days ago.. I liked the REM comments.. thanks! 
I should probably get my own 12 string .. this tune is a jam live with the band and I can’t wait to do more of that this year. 🤘🔥
What do you think? should I call this one Tennessee Road or Runnin’ down a Big Sky? This song is about having to prove myself over and over again no matter who what when where. Challenging myself getting my ass kicked and getting back up. That’s everyone’s story don’t you think? I can hear a gospel element to this song. Can’t wait to record this for real. Here’s a raw taste... what do you think?
This is how it starts off when I write my music most of the time. I’m just improvising a bit of the structure , the words and melody have a sketched outline but it comes at once, making it up as I go without thinking too much,  and then after, I make sense of what it means.. not sure if this song will stand the test of time I’ll try it with the band .. what do you think? I had a challenging year last year - I guess I’m writing a letter to my family and loved ones in this song , happy to say I’m great now and so positive and the toxic negativity has gone from my life, thank God &  I’m thankful for the lessons 🤘🙏